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Ugly History


TRIGGER WARNING. This post discusses current events, violence, and sexual assault. I scrapped my original post for this week. It seemed painfully self-involved given the circumstances of the world and can be summed up as the kids are good, there’s some holiday and birthday planning, and imagination play is a big deal in our world. My heart is heavy over all that is going on around the globe. It’s heavy, but I also recognize how little I can actually do outside of prayer. So I pray. God, I pray for the victims and their families, that they can find healing and forgiveness in these uncertain times. I pray for the leaders to show maturity and wisdom, to make decisions that will promote peace and resolution, and not fan the flames of hatred and revenge. I pray for the safety of the civilians, that especially the most vulnerable can find safety. I pray that people embroiled in global conflicts can recognize the humanity in their enemies. Hate begets hate. Love begets love. I pray that you bring comfort to those who mourn, healing for those who are hurt, and hope to those who feel hopeless. Amen. I feel sadness over the current events of the world, but anger over the current events at home. To be perfectly clear so this post doesn’t devolve into some partisan rant, I am deeply purple, a centrist at heart. A paralyzed and petty political party that can’t get it together for the good of the country is simply shameful. Now is not the time to reassign office space or dig your heels into the sand. Now is not the time to threaten government shutdowns (which ONLY hold regular American people hostage rather than solve any real problems). Now is the time to grow up and get back to the business of governing. Now is the time to reach across the aisle for the good of the nation and the world. Now is the time to lead and to govern. History has a way of repeating itself. The characters are different, and the cultural nuances play a role, as do the idiosyncrasies of geography and religious practices, but the story is more or less the same. Group A is the dominant group. The dominant group changes from time to time, but there’s undeniably a stronger group either due to economics, military strength, or political clout. Group A controls Group B in some manner. Group B gains the upper hand through some act. Group A fights back. Group B fights back. Sometimes Groups C, D, and so forth join the fray because of alliances, treaties, or battle spillover. The fighting goes on until there’s enough pain all around for a truce or surrender. Group A either retains dominance or there’s a new alpha. After a period of peace (or at least a period of retreat to regroup and rebuild), a few years or decades later, conflict breaks out again. The characters are different, and the cultural nuances play a role, as do the idiosyncrasies of geography and religious practices, but the story is more or less the same. What disturbs me the most about Hamas’s attack at the music festival in Israel is rape. Rape as an act of war is as old as history can record. Rape is more than just violence and subjugation. It’s a form of biological warfare where the perpetrators literally intend to spread their seed to a new generation. I ask myself, if an attack were to happen here, would women have the freedom to choose their own future? Suppose your wife, daughter, sister, or mother was raped in an act of war and paraded through the streets in bloodied sweatpants and she survives this unimaginably traumatic experience. Would current domestic laws heal or prolong this trauma? There is an undeniable rise in violence against women throughout the world, a trend that is deeply concerning. I am fearful of the future my daughters will face when they are women if these trends continue. My children know nothing of current events. I recently read a book about Grit to Hazel which included a story about Malala Yousafzai. It mentioned that she was shot by the Taliban for advocating for girls’ education and Hazel asked, “What does shot mean?” I said that a group of people called the Taliban hurt her for trying to help girls learn. “Why?” I said some people don’t believe that girls should learn. “Why?” I said I think some people are threatened when a woman knows too much. “Why?” She genuinely wanted to understand and I realized I couldn’t explain it in a way that would be understandable. She’s too young. She’s beautifully innocent and worries if she accidentally steps on a bug and is bothered by the idea of eating animals (especially if she has a stuffed animal representative). How can I explain to her what happened at a music festival that should have been a celebration? And I simply can’t because the cruelty is simply incomprehensible to her, nor would I because of her age, but if she were a middle schooler, how could I explain it to her and her sisters? I grapple with these questions because she may be too young for an explanation, but one day, she will need to know for her own safety and security that there is hurt and hate in the world. But if, just if, war ever were to come to our doorstep, if, just if, some deranged person with a chip on his or her shoulder were to show up with a gun, shouldn’t children know that there are people in the world that mean them harm, that sometimes there is hurt, ugliness, and hatred that is misdirected to the innocent? Wouldn’t learning the full scale of history, the good, bad, and ugly, help prepare them when war and violence break out? And these are the questions that I’m obsessing over today.


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Misafir
23 Eki 2023
5 üzerinden 5 yıldız

very poignant and painfully accurate.

Beğen

Misafir
16 Eki 2023
5 üzerinden 5 yıldız

Incredibly thoughtful and well written.

Beğen
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